Angry consumers more likely to bilk insurers

angry_man_mobile_homeFear and anger are two emotions that drive human behavior. But only one of them — anger — is more likely to cause people to cheat.

That’s the finding of a recent study that tested how people’s emotions can influence ethical behavior. When situations put people in fear, they are more likely to be honest, the study concluded. This seems obvious. The threat of jail or embarrassment keeps people from committing insurance fraud.

But the new revelation here is that anger tends to have the opposite effect. It emboldens consumers to defraud, especially against businesses, the researchers say. This is in line with a Coalition study from 2007. It found that consumers who had a positive claim experience in the past three years were much-less-tolerant of fraud than those who didn’t.

Insurers should take note and adopt more customer-service policies that are less likely to tick people off.

Everyone seems to have an insurance horror story, and many originated from the lack of understanding about insurance. The insurance industry just doesn’t do a good job of explaining coverage and the nuances of underwriting.

I was reminded of that this week when a boater friend relayed his horror story about relocating his vessel eight miles from southern Georgia to northern Florida. His annual premium went from $1,500 to more than $4,000. He was livid, especially since the insurer didn’t bother explaining the 100-percent-plus premium hike.

Whether it’s underwriting, claims handling, marketing or any contact insurers have with consumers, insurers could profit by making their customers a little less angry and a lot more informed.

About the author: Dennis Jay is executive director of the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud.