Could bogus health scams emerge from health reform

It’s anyone’s guess what will happen with the off-again, on-again attempts to repeal/replace/improve the Affordable Care Act.

But one thing seems sure: Republicans in Congress and the White House seem bent on pushing a couple of changes every scam artist should love.

The first is H.R. 1101, the Small Business Health Fairness Act of 2017. It would allow health insurance to be sold through association health plans. It sounds like a solid idea — get a bunch of like-minded people or businesses together, form your own plan and buy coverage in the unregulated secondary market. There’s a lot of problems here, as consumer and healthcare groups point out in a recent letter to Congress.

Our biggest beef is that the bill would exempt AHPs from some state regulation. Lax scrutiny could tempt scam artists to set up their own AHP, collect a ton of premiums and then disappear. It’s happened before.

The same scenario is likely with selling health insurance across state lines. The lack of regulatory oversight is an invitation for scam artists to defraud individuals and businesses by setting up bogus health plans.

The White House likens selling health insurance across state lines to selling auto insurance across state lines, which to our knowledge doesn’t happen. Do supporters of these proposals simply not understand the potential consequences for consumers?

Most supporters probably don’t remember the last wave of bogus health plans during 2000-2002. The Government Accountability Office reported 144 unauthorized entities peddled bogus health coverage to more than 200,000 policyholders. The cons stole at least a quarter billion dollars in lost premiums and unpaid medical claims many victims were forced to pay out of their own pockets. One family had a child with brain cancer, only to discover they’d bought fake coverage.

Stricter laws and tighter regulation followed, and the bogus health plans seemed to disappear. Whatever happens with healthcare, let’s hope Congress has the wisdom to first do no harm in aiding and abetting healthcare scams.

About the author: Dennis Jay is executive director of the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud.