Humble and brazen health claims

$100,000 for ear wax removal? $46,000 to remove a bunion? Those are some of the outrageous charges cited this week by a judge who awarded Aetna $51.4 million from a Houston surgical hospital.

In a two-year period, Humble Surgical Hospital in Houston, Tex. billed the insurer more than $68 million. Humble billings these are not.

The five-bed surgical center, created by 10 doctors in 2010, charged patients in-network rates but billed the insurer at out-of-network rates. Some bills were as high as ten times what other hospitals charge.

Why did the insurer paid $41 million before challenging Humble’s bills? Aetna isn’t known for throwing money at medical providers, and it sponsors a good SIU team. (Full disclosure: Aetna provides health insurance for Coalition staff.)

Perhaps part of the problem is prompt-pay laws in many states that encourage insurers to “pay and chase” suspect claims. Some states grant delays in paying claims when fraud is suspected. Others do not.

The Humble claims spanned 2010 to 2012. Since then, new technologies such as predictive modeling have been developed to help insurers detect claim anomalies quicker and better. Another new development is the sharing of suspect claims information through the Healthcare Fraud Prevention Partnership.

As someone who pays a hefty monthly premium for health insurance, I hope Aetna and other health insurers use all the anti-fraud tools at their disposal to keep such brazen claims practices in check.

About the author: Dennis Jay is executive director of the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud.