Sober home: Will we demand reform?

The largest Medicare-Medicaid takedown in history recently underscored the vast scope of America’s addiction epidemic — and the role insurance fraud plays as the deadly financier.

More than 400 people were charged with bilking health insurers out of $1.3 billion in bogus bills for addictive opioids across 20 states.

Corrupt sober homes are the newest discovery in the opioid crisis. Sober home owners routinely spoon drugs to addicts so they’ll keep relapsing. The homes, rehab facilities and drug-testing labs get more shots at inflated insurance billings.

Thankfully, the corruption is now wide out in the open. Investigative news stories have appeared in droves over the last few months.

We have to ask how so much fraud could’ve spread before anyone discovered the vastness of the crimes. Why did the safety net break down so badly, and how do we repair it?

The respected SunSentinel has done some of the best investigative reporting of sober-home fraud in South Florida. It believes:

“Shared responsibility also lies with insurance companies, who through incompetence or negligence seemingly have no problem pumping blood money into fraudulent schemes that feed a largely failed relapse industry by paying billions in insurance claims as if these were established medical procedures, which they are not, and which have, in fact, provided little in the way of sustained recovery for suffering addicts and desperate families,” the SunSentinel says in an oped.

Of course responsibility extends to lax policymaking, perhaps sleepy law enforcement and other corners of the safety net.

Once the drama of betrayed addicts and sleazy treatment dies down, will the story go away as just another news cycle? Or will we stay focused and keep up the pressure for workable solutions? Some of the hardest work lies ahead.

About the author: Jim Quiggle is director of communications for the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud